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old number 2

Old number 2

Fancy breakfast In bed delivered straight to your door?

From breakfast in bed to night time feasts – DIY kits to make the most of lockdown by The Address collection of local London neighbourhood bars.

The Menu

Six Delicious DIY kits to choose from…

Breakfast In Bed – Meat Feast House Brekky for Two

Breakfast In Bed – Vegan / Vegetarian House Brekky for Two

Breakfast In Bed – Grain Box Brekky for Two

The Feast – Lunch or Supper for Two

The House Burger DIY kit for Two

The London Halloumi DIY Kit for Two (vegetarian)

How do I order?
Pre order your Address at home meal kit by 3pm every Wednesday for courier collection every Friday between midday & 1pm.

No 32 The Old Town is an all day bar and restaurant minutes Clapham Common station, with views over the Common. Menus are freshly prepared in house, starting with breakfast every day from 9am, cocktails and sharing plates throughout the day, an all day brunch on the weekends, finishing off the week with a Sunday Roast and a mean Bloody Mary.

Two-factor authentication for Apple ID

Two-factor authentication is an extra layer of security for your Apple ID and is designed to ensure that you’re the only person who can access your account, even if someone else knows your password.

How it works

With two-factor authentication, only you can access your account on a trusted device or the web. When you want to sign in to a new device for the first time, you’ll need to provide two pieces of information — your password and the six-digit verification code that’s automatically displayed on your trusted devices or sent to your phone number. By entering the code, you’re verifying that you trust the new device. For example, if you have an iPhone and are signing in to your account for the first time on a newly purchased Mac, you’ll be prompted to enter your password and the verification code that’s automatically displayed on your iPhone.

Because your password alone is no longer enough to access your account, two-factor authentication dramatically improves the security of your Apple ID and all the personal information you store with Apple.

Once you’ve signed in, you won’t be asked for a verification code on that device again unless you sign out completely, erase the device or need to change your password for security reasons. When you sign in on the web, you can choose to trust your browser, so you won’t be asked for a verification code the next time you sign in from that computer.

Trusted devices

A trusted device is an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch with iOS 9 and later, or Mac with OS X El Capitan and later that you’ve already signed in to using two-factor authentication. It’s a device we know is yours and that can be used to verify your identity by displaying a verification code from Apple when you sign in on a different device or browser. An Apple Watch with watchOS 6 or later can receive verification codes when you sign in with your Apple ID, but cannot act as a trusted device for password resets.

Trusted phone numbers

A trusted phone number is a number that can be used to receive verification codes by text message or automated phone call. You must verify at least one trusted phone number to enrol in two-factor authentication.

You should also consider verifying an additional phone number you can access, such as a home phone, or a number used by a family member or close friend. You can use this number if you temporarily can’t access your primary number or your own devices.

Verification codes

A verification code is a temporary code sent to your trusted device or phone number when you sign in to a new device or browser with your Apple ID. You can also get a verification code from Settings on your trusted device.

A verification code is different from the device passcode you enter to unlock your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch.

Set up two-factor authentication for your Apple ID

You can follow these steps to turn on two-factor authentication on your device. Find out more about the availability of two-factor authentication.

Turn on two-factor authentication on your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch

Turn on two-factor authentication in Settings

If you’re using iOS 10.3 or later:

  1. Go to Settings > [your name] > Password & Security.
  2. Tap Turn On Two-Factor Authentication.
  3. Tap Continue.

If you’re using iOS 10.2 or earlier:

  1. Go to Settings > iCloud.
  2. Tap your Apple ID > Password & Security.
  3. Tap Turn On Two-Factor Authentication.
  4. Tap Continue.

You may be asked to answer your Apple ID security questions.

Enter and verify your trusted phone number

Enter the phone number where you want to receive verification codes when you sign in. You can choose to receive the codes by text message or automated phone call.

When you tap Next, Apple sends a verification code to the phone number you provided.

Enter the verification code to verify your phone number and turn on two-factor authentication.

Turn on two-factor authentication on your Mac

If you’re using macOS Catalina:

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click Apple ID.
  2. Click Password & Security under your name.
  3. Click Turn On Two-Factor Authentication.

If you’re using macOS Mojave or earlier:

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences, then click iCloud, and select Account Details.
  2. Click Security.
  3. Click Turn On Two-Factor Authentication.

Some Apple IDs created in iOS 10.3 or macOS 10.12.4 and later are protected with two-factor authentication by default. In this case, you see that two-factor authentication is already turned on.

Create an Apple ID with two-factor authentication on the web

If you don’t have an iPhone, iPad, iPod touch or Mac, you can create a new Apple ID with two-factor authentication on the web.

If you have an Apple ID that’s not protected by two-factor authentication, some Apple websites may ask you to update your account.

What to remember when you use two-factor authentication

Two-factor authentication significantly improves the security of your Apple ID. After you turn it on, signing into your account will require both your password and access to your trusted devices or trusted phone number. To keep your account as secure as possible and help ensure you never lose access, there are a few simple guidelines you should follow:

  • Remember your Apple ID password.
  • Use a device passcode on all your devices.
  • Keep your trusted phone number(s) up to date.
  • Keep your trusted devices physically secure.

Manage your account

You can manage your trusted phone numbers, trusted devices, and other account information from your Apple ID account page.

Keep your trusted phone numbers up to date

To use two-factor authentication, you need at least one trusted phone number on file where you can receive verification codes. Consider verifying an additional trusted phone number other than your own phone number. If your iPhone is your only trusted device and it is missing or damaged, you will be unable to receive verification codes required to access your account.

You can update your trusted phone numbers when you follow these steps:

  1. Go to your Apple ID account page.
  2. Sign in with your Apple ID.
  3. Go to the Security section and click Edit.

If you want to add a phone number, click Add a Trusted Phone Number and enter the phone number. Choose to verify the number with a text message or automated phone call, and click Continue. To remove a trusted phone number, click next to the phone number you want to remove.

View and manage your trusted devices

You can view and manage a list of your trusted devices on iOS, macOS and in the Devices section of your Apple ID account page.

  1. Go to Settings > [your name].
  2. Select a device from the list.

On macOS Catalina:

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences.
  2. Select Apple ID.
  3. Select a device from the sidebar.

On macOS Mojave or earlier:

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences.
  2. Select iCloud, then click Account Details.
  3. Click the Devices tab.
  4. Select a device from the list.

  1. Go to your Apple ID account page.
  2. Sign in with your Apple ID.
  3. Go to the Devices section.

The device list shows the devices that you’re currently signed in to with your Apple ID. Select a device to view device info like the model and serial number. Below that you can see other useful information, including whether or not the device is trusted and can be used to receive Apple ID verification codes.

You can also remove a trusted device by selecting Remove from Account from the device list. Removing a trusted device will ensure that it can no longer display verification codes and that access to iCloud, and other Apple services on the device, is blocked until you sign in again with two-factor authentication. If you need to find or erase your device before you remove it from your trusted device list, you can use Find My iPhone.

Generate app-specific passwords

With two-factor authentication, you need an app-specific password to sign in to your account using third-party apps or services such as email, contacts, or calendar apps not provided by Apple. Follow these steps to generate an app-specific password:

  1. Sign in to your Apple ID account page.
  2. Click Generate Password below App-Specific Passwords.
  3. Follow the steps on your screen.

After generating your app-specific password, enter or paste it into the password field of the app as you would normally.

Two-factor authentication is an extra layer of security for your Apple ID and is designed to ensure that you're the only person who can access your account, even if someone else knows your password. ]]>