Categories
BLOG

james gatzke lottery winner

I SPENT LAST 3 BUCKS ON LOTTERY AND WON pounds 3.2M; Beggar James’ joy at `miracle’.

Byline: By ANTHONY HARWOOD

A BEGGAR who wanted to die was last night pounds 3.2 million richer after putting his last three dollars on a lottery ticket.

And James Gatzke said: “Life’s like a rollercoaster. You can be high and you can be low but life averages out.

“It’s really sort of a miracle. All I wanted for Christmas was to have dinner with my parents in heaven. That’s how down and depressed I was.”

The first thing James bought after his numbers came up was a shaver so officials at the lottery office would recognise him. He said: “The women at the lottery office did not believe I was who I said I was. The first thing I bought was a shaver because my ID showed me clean shaven.”

James, 44, of Chicago, was battling depression in August whenhelosthistaxidriverjob.

For three months, he begged and borrowed from neighbours to buy food for himself and his seven cats.

He said: “I had nothing to live for. I was down and out and I had lost my job.

“There were holes in my shoes and my glasses are 12 years old and held together with a paper clip.

“They cut the water off and then they cut off the gas and my roof was falling in.”

Then came the night he walked into a petrol station to buy a ticket.

But despite his big win, James remains cautious.

He wants a new home and hassplashedoutona Cadillac but it’s 12 years old with 155,000 miles on the clock.

James said: “I’m a simple guy. I didn’t need anything new or showy. I love this car. And it sure beats walking.”

He is alsotakingcareoftwo elderly ladies who looked after him before his big win two weeks ago.

Rather than one lump sum, James decided to take 26 annualpayments of pounds 150,000.

He said: “I’m not going to do anything differently.

“I am going to get my glasses fixed. I am going to relax and take it easy for a while. And I am going to play the lottery.”

ROAD TO RICHES: James and his second-hand Cadillac

Free Online Library: I SPENT LAST 3 BUCKS ON LOTTERY AND WON pounds 3.2M; Beggar James' joy at `miracle'.(News) by "Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland)"; News, opinion and commentary General interest

James gatzke lottery winner

Posted on 12/12/2003 11:53:59 AM PST by martin_fierro

Chicago man, on skid row, hits five million-dollar jackpot

Wed Dec 10, 7:00 PM ET

CHICAGO (AFP) – James Gatzke was struggling with depression, and living off handouts and charity, with only his seven cats for company, when he hit the jackpot.

Three weeks ago, the unemployed 44-year-old was eating beef stew out of a can, and scraping by on food and cash donations from neighbours and charities.

His water and power supply had long been cut off, he hadn’t worked since August when he was laid off from his job as a cab driver, and he hadn’t bathed in months.

“All I wanted for Christmas was to have dinner with my parents in heaven. That’s how down and depressed I was,” Gatzke said.

A gamble on the Illinois state lottery changed all that, turning the down-at-heel Gatzke into a multi-millionaire overnight when he netted 5.5 million dollars in a November 26 draw.

“It feels like I hit a homerun in the ninth inning of the World Series (news – web sites),” he said this week. “I still can’t believe it happened.”

With no immediate living relatives, Gatzke called on a longtime friend, J.R. Bramlett, to help him manage his new-found funds.

Within a day, Bramlett helped Gatzke open a bank account and buy a car — a black 1991 Cadillac with 155,000 miles on it. Bramlett also took Gatzke for his first full meal since November 20 — a prime rib dinner with all the trimmings.

In return, Gatzke made Bramlett his beneficiary should something happen to him.

Gatzke is close to buying a home and barn on 3.5 acres in the country.

He’s considering donating the modest brick bungalow that he inherited from his parents in Calumet Park, suburban Chicago, to a local church, and of course he’s promising to take care of the two elderly ladies who helped him out during the tough times.

But otherwise, Gatzke is not planning any major changes.

“I’m going to relax and take it easy for a while,” he said. “And I am going to play the Mega Millions (lottery).”

The chances of their being anything left when he meets his demise are slim and none.

“His water and power supply had long been cut off, he hadn’t worked since August when he was laid off from his job as a cab driver, and he hadn’t bathed in months.”

Thank goodness he had at least enuf money to gamble.

He’s considering donating the modest brick bungalow that he inherited from his parents in Calumet Park, suburban Chicago, to a local church, and of course he’s promising to take care of the two elderly ladies who helped him out during the tough times.

Wotta buddy. Those new Toyotas are nothing but trouble. 12/12/2003 11:59:22 AM PST by martin_fierro (Ohhh. ehhh. ¿Peeka Panish?)

Actually, most people who win big in lotteries manage just fine.

There are exceptions, and those are the ones you hear about.

“The chances of their being anything left when he meets his demise are slim and none.”

Anyone want to take bets on how long till he starts sleeping on the streets again?

Within a day, Bramlett helped Gatzke open a bank account and buy a car — a black 1991 Cadillac with 155,000 miles on it. Bramlett also took Gatzke for his first full meal since November 20 — a prime rib dinner with all the trimmings.

That’s a pretty modest car for a multimillionaire.

Well I for one am happy for the guy.

Only a negative person would have something nasty to say about this story.

Winning The National Lottery Is Good For You!

15 November 1999

Camelot Group Plc, operator of The UK National Lottery, today Monday 15th November 1999, released the first ever major survey of National Lottery winners to discover what effect the lottery really has on happiness, lifestyles and relationships.

The unique survey carried out by MORI, marks the 5th birthday of The National Lottery and the findings represent the most complete snapshot of the generation of Lottery winners who have emerged since the first draw on 19 November 1994. MORI questioned 249 players who had won at least £50,000 and respondents included 111 winners of more than £1 million.

It’s who you are not what you win .

More than half the Lottery winners are happier now than they were before their win (55%). Most of the other winners claim that winning the Lottery has not affected their level of happiness, largely due to the fact that they were happy before their win. Only 2% of winners were less happy. The happiness of the winner is not affected by the size of his or her win. Those having won £50k to £250k are just as likely to be happier following their win, as those who have won more than £1m, which suggests that it is as much the person’s character as well as winning something which is the key to their happiness.

Of the winners who are happier (55%) around two thirds claim one of the reasons is improved financial security and fewer worries (65%). A further 23% either stated that they can buy what they want now or that life is generally a lot easier.

The large majority of Lottery winners have not experienced any negative effects on family life or friendships. Of those respondents who were married before their win (67%), well over nine out of ten (95%) remain married. All of the winners who were living with a partner prior to their win (but not married), are still in the same relationship (whether now married or not).

Unlike the winner, it appears that the increased happiness of winners’ families is dependent on the size of their relative’s win. A higher proportion of winners of £250k or more state that their family is happier (58%) compared with those who have won less than this amount (37%). The main reason for improved family happiness is increased financial security (34%).

Eighty three per cent of winners have given some of their winnings to their family. Of these winners, two thirds have given money to their siblings, 57% to their children and 51% to their parents. The range of recipients appears to be influenced by the size of the win.

The findings also indicate that the larger the win, the more likely that the winner’s family will ask for money (17% of families asked for winnings from winners of £50k-£250k, compared with 29% of families with a relative winning £2m+).

Lucky for friends .

Of the two thirds of winners who stated they had a best friend before their win, nine out of ten winners are still best friends with the same person. Men appear to be more generous with their winnings than women. On average men have given money to around three friends, compared with one friend for women. Men also appear to give away larger amounts. On average, the largest amount given away by men was around £147,000, while the average for women was only £60,000. And winners from Scotland and Northern England gave away the largest amounts to friends, which averaged £228k and £173k respectively. This compares to those from the midlands (£66k) and Southern England (17K). The largest single amount of money given away by one respondent is a staggering £3m.

Twenty four per cent of all winners socialise with other winners through Camelot rising to half of those of more than £2m.

Different lifestyle .

As might be expected, the lifestyles of many Lottery winners have changed significantly. Aside from large purchases (such as cars, homes and holidays) other changes include making increased contributions to charity (40%) of winners and going on holiday abroad for the first time (19%). Twelve per cent of winners have still not been abroad and for 7% of winners a caravan is one of their major purchases.

Just under 40% of winners have moved home since their win. Although the proportion of winners who have moved house is influenced by the size of their win, only 50% of winners of more than £2m have moved house since their win.

Of those who have moved, three quarters now live in detached houses. Most of those who have moved have not moved far – an average of nine miles. Fifty six per cent of winners of £1m or more who have moved house consider their new home to be in the countryside. Winners of larger amounts often own more than one home (26%), with a quarter of those owning property abroad.

Other significant lifestyle changes include; one in ten winners have switched to private medical care since their win and 1% have had plastic surgery. Three per cent have moved their children from state schools to private schools (including 9% of winners of £2m or more).

Most winners (84%) have not taken up any new hobbies since their win. Twelve per cent of winners have joined health clubs, although a third of all winners state they have gained weight since their win (32%) with a further 14% losing weight.

On average, the winners have so far spent 44% of their winnings and 23% of all winners made use of the independent advisory panel put forward by Camelot. This figure rises to 40% of those winners of more than £1m.

Still like a bargain .

Food shopping habits also indicate only a marginal change. Over a third of winners (37%) still buy supermarket own brands, regardless of the size of the win. Only 4% claim to have switched from buying supermarket brands to individual brands.

Still working .

Around half of those winners who were in regular work before their win are still in the same job (48%), falling to 27% among winners of £2m or more. Just over half of the winners of more than £1m have given up work altogether (56%). Of those winners who have started a new job since their win (15%), around half have started their own business (45%), including almost all of those who have won more than £1m.

And finally .

Winning the Lottery appears to have very little impact on the winners’ perception of their social class or their political persuasion. Fifty-two per cent of winners of £2m+ consider themselves to be working class, compared with 60% before their win.

Around nine out of ten Lottery winners still participate in the lottery every week (88%), and 91% of winners of £2m or more still play. Only 2% have stopped playing altogether.

Dianne Thompson, Commercial Operations Director for Camelot commented; “The survey gives a uniquely historic insight into the lives of Lottery winners over the last five years. So far, for the vast majority of winners, the experience is a fun and happy one”.

Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-20 , 21-36 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

James gatzke lottery winner Posted on 12/12/2003 11:53:59 AM PST by martin_fierro Chicago man, on skid row, hits five million-dollar jackpot Wed Dec 10, 7:00 PM ET CHICAGO (AFP) –