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WHEN WE FIGHT, WE WIN!: THE PODCAST

When We Fight, We Win!: The Podcast reveals the stories behind the fight. And the wins! We’re here for everyone who’s ready to get a switch flipped in their brain. For everyone who’s ready to go from being an organizer in theory, to a transformative one in practice. Because every organizer started somewhere.

Greg Jobin-Leeds and Dey Hernandez of AgitArte co-authored When We Fight, We Win! in 2016. Now they are co-hosting and releasing a podcast series that brings the ideas, art, and words of the book to life. In every episode, we welcome Jorge Diaz to introduce our “Word of the Day” segment.

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  • What can you do now that you’ve listened to “Decolonizing the Land, Liberating the Farmer”? Wednesday, July 15, 2020
  • Podcast Episode 7: Decolonizing the Land, Liberating the Farmer Wednesday, July 15, 2020
  • What can you do now that you’ve listened to ‘The Sabotage of Black Education: The Fight Against Rahm Emanuel to Save Dyett High School’? Wednesday, July 1, 2020

What Can You Do Now That You’ve Listened to ‘Queer Freedom & Trans Delight. Trans Day of Resilience Art Project with Micah Bazant + Kemi Alibi’

By: Greg Jobin-Leeds Thalia Carroll-Cachimuel LGBTQIA+ Organizations to Donate to & Learn More About Southerners On New Ground (SONG) is a home for LGBTQ liberation…

When We Fight, We Win! The Podcast

Soul Fire Farm heals ancestral wounds.

Episode 7 of When We Fight, We Win! The Podcast “Decolonizing the Land, Liberating the Farmer” features # LeahPenniman of Soul Fire Farm. Soul Fire Farm is a BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) centered community farm committed to ending racism and injustice in the food system. They teach folks how to farm and reconnect with the earth and their ancestors. Leah is the author of “Farming While Black”.

98% of the land to grow crops on in the United States today is white owned. This is the lowest it has been in history. Much of the formerly owned Black and brown land was stolen and is still owned by the descendants of white families. What does this mean for communities of color now? Leah provides powerful insights on how we can decolonize the land and our minds.

From land reparations to acknowledging social disparities to access to culturally appropriate food, Leah takes us on a journey of healing trauma. As Leah’s daughter Ashima says, “the food system is everything it takes to get sunshine to your plate”.

Please listen to this critical episode and check out how to get involved.

Learn more about the Reparations Map for Black-Indigenous Farmers here: https://www.soulfirefarm.org/get-involved/reparations/

Episode 7 is out and available across all podcast streaming platforms.

WHEN WE FIGHT, WE WIN!: THE PODCAST When We Fight, We Win!: The Podcast reveals the stories behind the fight. And the wins! We’re here for everyone who’s ready to get a switch flipped in

Conditionals

A conditional sentence is a sentence containing the word if. There are three common types* of conditional sentence:

  1. if clause > present simple tense : main clause > future tense (will)
    • If you help me, I will help you.
    • If I win the lottery, I will buy a new car.
    • If it snows tomorrow, we will go skiing.
  2. if clause > past simple tense : main clause > would
    • If you knew her, you would agree with me.
    • If I won the lottery, I would buy a new car.
    • If it snowed tomorrow, we would go skiing.
  3. if clause > past perfect tense : main clause > would have
    • If you had helped me, I would have helped you.
    • If I had won the lottery, I would have bought a new car.
    • If it had snowed yesterday, we would have gone skiing.

Of course, it is possible to start conditional sentences with the main clause:

  • I will buy a new car if I win the lottery.
  • I would buy a new car if I won the lottery.
  • I would have bought a new car if I had won the lottery.

English speakers choose one of the three conditional structures as follows:

    Conditional one – to express a simple statement of fact or intent

  • I will buy a new car if I win the lottery.
  • I will go home if you don’t stop criticizing me.
  • You will fail your exams if you don’t start working harder.
  • She will lose all her friends if she continues to talk about them behind their backs.

  • Conditional two – to refer to a present unreal situation or to a situation in the future that the speaker thinks is unlikely to happen

    • If I had a lot of money, I would buy a new car. (but I don’t have a lot of money)
    • If I were you, I would tell him you’re sorry. (but I am not you)
    • If I won the lottery, I would buy a new house. (but I don’t expect to win the lottery)
    • If it snowed tomorrow, we would go skiing. (but I don’t have much hope that it will snow)

  • Conditional three – to refer to the past and situations that did not happen

    • If it had snowed yesterday, we would have gone skiing. (but it didn’t snow, so we didn’t go skiing)
    • If you had studied harder, you would have passed your test. (but you didn’t study hard, so you didn’t pass your test)
    • If I had known that, I would have told you. (but I didn’t know, so I didn’t tell you)
    • If she hadn’t been driving slowly, she would have had an accident. (but she was driving slowly, so she didn’t have an accident)
  • * Note: The way native speakers of English express conditions (use if-clauses) is much more varied than the 3 rigid combinations of tenses exemplified on this page. Learners should consult a good grammar reference work for a deeper understanding of this complex aspect of English grammar.

    Grammar practice for ESL students.