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cutoff to buy powerball ticket

How Late Can You Buy Powerball Tickets?

Guys, I like you too much to lie to you, so I have to give it to you straight: The odds that you’ll win the Powerball jackpot tonight are not that great. To be more specific, your chances of winning the $1.5 billion jackpot are one in 292,201,338. For a little context here, your odds of becoming president in your lifetime are one in 10 million. Am I trying to say that becoming the leader of the free world and/or becoming ludicrously wealthy via games of chance are not worthwhile pursuits? No way — I’m just saying that we should all be informed of the odds before we embark on any endeavor, be it purchasing lottery tickets or mounting a sudden and very surprising presidential campaign.

UPDATE: This post was originally published in January 2016. As of Aug. 23, 2017, the new Powerball jackpot has hit $700 million (and if there are no winners, it’ll go to $1 billion). Just like always, the Powerball will be drawn at 10:59 p.m. EST. While ticket cutoffs vary state by state, assume that you need to have your ticket in hand at least one to two hours before the drawing. For those on the East Coast, that means by around 9 or 10 p.m. For those on Central Time, that means by around 8 or 9 p.m. For those in Mountain Time, by 7 or 8 p.m. And for people on the West Coast, by 6 or 7 p.m. at the latest.

EARLIER: But the steep odds are no reason to not buy a ticket or 40, if you feel so moved. I mean, someone has to win, right? But if you’re anything like me, you’re probably going to spend the next few hours going back and forth on the issue, trying to figure out if you’d rather gamble a little or invest your money in a sure thing, like a burrito — only to run out of your house in your pajamas at the last possible second to buy a ticket tonight. With that in mind, how late can you buy Powerball tickets?

The answer’s a little more complicated than it would initially appear. The Powerball drawing will occur at 10:59 p.m. EST tonight, and according to Powerball.com, “Draw sales cut off at least 59 minutes before the draw, but a state may cut off sales earlier.”

And a brief survey of state Powerball sites shows that the cutoff times do indeed vary slightly around the country. For instance, Pennsylvania’s cutoff time for buying Powerball tickets is 9:59 p.m. EST the day of the drawing, while in Arkansas, tickets can be sold until one hour before the drawing — which, since Arkansas is in the Central Time Zone, would be 8:59 p.m. Oregon Live reports that denizens of the Beaver State need to have their tickets in hand by 7 p.m. PST, and folks from Illinois need to have their tickets purchased by 9 p.m. CST. In my state of residence, New York, you can buy tickets until 10 p.m. EST (which means I need to get it together and decide how much of my burrito money I’m willing to dip into for this very soon).

Knowing the time at which your state cuts off ticket sales can help you avoid long lines filled with other folks who left it to the last second, but it can also help ensure that if you win, you’ll actually get the money. There have in fact been past lottery winners who were disqualified after it was discovered that they purchased their winning ticket after the sales deadline. In 2013, a California woman found that she had bought a Powerball ticket with all the winning numbers, but further investigation showed that she had done so after sales for that drawing had closed. In 2008, a Canadian man named Joel Ifergan purchased a lottery ticket with winning numbers, but was disqualified from claiming any of the jackpot after it was learned he had purchased his ticket seven seconds after the sales cut off. So while regulations obviously vary in different states and countries, it is clear that lotto officials take timing seriously. If you’re gonna play, it pays to know the rules.

So go forth and play if you wish! And remember: No matter what happens tonight, you’re still a winner to me! But also, if you do win, I have to talk to you about possibly donating some cash for my extremely pressing burrito research.

Guys, I like you too much to lie to you, so I have to give it to you straight: The odds that you’ll win the Powerball jackpot tonight are not that great. To be more specific, your chances of winning the $1.5 billion jackpot are one in 292,201,338.…

Cutoff to buy powerball ticket

Sales cut-off times vary by one to two hours before the drawings on Wednesday and Saturday evenings, depending on the selling jurisdiction.

Some lotteries sell Powerball® tickets over the Internet, but the service is only available to residents of that jurisdiction. The sale of Powerball tickets over the Internet or by mail across jurisdictional borders is restricted. Lotteries may refuse to pay out prize money on Powerball tickets purchased on any website other than their own. Please contact your lottery with any further questions.

You do not have to be a U.S. citizen or U.S. resident to play Powerball®. Players from jurisdictions where Powerball tickets are not sold, either in the United States or outside the country, when visiting a selling jurisdiction, can purchase Powerball tickets from a retailer licensed or authorized by the selling jurisdiction, if they meet the legal age requirement in the jurisdiction of purchase. Federal and jurisdictional income taxes may apply to any claimed prize money.

The 10X multiplier is only in play when the advertised jackpot annuity is $150 million or less.

Powerball® tickets print the white ball numbers in numerical order of a given play. You can match the white ball numbers in any order of a given play to win a prize. The red Powerball number of a given play on your ticket must match the red Powerball drawn. Each play on a ticket is separately determined; players cannot crisscross play lines on a ticket or combine numbers from other tickets.

While there are many factors that determine the advertised Grand Prize estimate in the Powerball® game; two important ones are games sales and the annuity factor.

A number of variables can affect game sales, such as seasonality or a big Mega Millions jackpot. Traditionally, game sales are stronger for a Saturday drawing versus a Wednesday drawing.

The annuity factor, or the cost to fund an annuity prize, is another key component. The annuity factor is made up of interest rates for securities purchased to fund prize payments. The higher the interest rates, the higher the advertised Grand Prize. You might not realize that an economic reality like interest rates impact even the Powerball jackpot, but they do!

Most players think the odds of matching the Powerball to win a prize are 1 in 26, since the Powerball is drawn from a field of numbers from 1 to 26.

But consider this…

The odds of matching the Powerball ALONE are harder than 1 in 26, because there is also the chance you could match one or more white balls, in addition to the Powerball, to win another prize.

Powerball numbers are drawn from two sets of numbers, so the odds of winning a prize are calculated by combining the odds for both sets of numbers for all prize levels. The odds for matching just the Powerball are calculated by combining the odds of selecting the Powerball and the odds of not selecting any of the five numbers from the first set of numbers drawn.

Prizes must be claimed in the jurisdiction where the winning ticket was purchased. Players can generally claim a prize up to $600 at any licensed lottery retailer in the jurisdiction where they bought the ticket. Prizes over $600 can be claimed at some lottery offices, depending on the amount, and also at lottery headquarters. Please contact your lottery with any further questions.

Ticket expiration dates typically vary from 90 days to one year depending on the selling jurisdiction. The expiration date is often listed on the back of your ticket. If the expiration date is not listed, check with your lottery.

Unclaimed prizes are kept by the lottery jurisdiction. If a Grand Prize goes unclaimed, the money must be returned to all lotteries in proportion to their sales for the draw run. The lotteries then distribute the money, based on their own jurisdiction’s laws, to other lottery games or to their jurisdiction’s general fund, or otherwise as required by law.

Every jurisdiction has its own law on winners remaining anonymous. Some jurisdictions are required by law to provide the winner’s name, city of residence, game won and prize amount to any third party that requests the information. Other jurisdictions allow winners to create trusts to shield their names from the public, or otherwise claim prizes anonymously. Check with your lottery to see if taking a photo of the winner is required and what its rules are on prize claims. Even if you keep your identity secret from the media and the public, you will have to be known to the lottery so officials can confirm you are eligible to play and win, as well as other legal requirements.

A Powerball jackpot winner may choose to receive their prize as an annuity, paid in 30 graduated payments over 29 years, or a lump-sum payment (cash option). For the annuity, the annual payments increase by 5%. The cash value option, in general, is the amount of money required to be in the jackpot prize pool, on the day of the drawing, to fund the estimated jackpot annuity prize. The advertised jackpot annuity and cash value are estimates until ticket sales are final, and for the annuity, until the Multi-State Lottery Association takes bids on the purchase of securities.

Federal and jurisdictional income taxes apply to both jackpot prize options.

Check with your lottery for its rules on how to claim a jackpot prize and the correct procedure for selecting the annuity or cash value option.

If a jackpot winner dies before receiving all annual installments, the balance of the prize will be paid to the winner’s estate. Upon receipt of a court order, annual prize payments will continue to be paid to the winner’s heirs. Other provisions may also apply depending on the laws of the lottery paying the prize.

A United States $100 bill is .0043 inches thick.

Ten thousand $100 bills equals $1 million (10,000 x $100 = $1,000,000).

Therefore, a $1 million stack of $100 bills is 43 inches tall (10,000 x .0043 inches = 43 inches).

43 inches = 3.5833 feet

A stack of one hundred dollar bills equaling $40,000,000 is 143.33 feet tall (40 x 3.5833 feet = 143.33 feet).

Cutoff to buy powerball ticket Sales cut-off times vary by one to two hours before the drawings on Wednesday and Saturday evenings, depending on the selling jurisdiction. Some lotteries sell